Pepper Tree courtyard

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Spotted locally around dusk, a front-house courtyard with Pepper Tree (Schinus molle), stone paving “grouted” with Dymondia margaretae.

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Planting includes euphorbias, agaves, phormiums (or dianella) a small Cercis ‘Forest Pansy,’ and purple irises in bloom near the side gate.
There may possibly be bauhinias as well (pink flowers at roof height).

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Plantings are repeated the length of the entrance garden, including a cercis on either side of the front walkway, another pepper tree at the far end.
Aeonium-filled black urns flank the arched entranceway.

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It struck me as such a vibrant example of reimagining the space from the front door to the sidewalk.
Imagine how dreary and perfunctory the same images would be if replaced with lawn.
Private yet still inviting, full of interest but mindful of an overall quiet balance, showcase and shady retreat in one stroke. Nailed it!


8 thoughts on “Pepper Tree courtyard

  1. Absolutely beautiful. The only way that would make it even better would be more agaves, LOL.

    I finally found a flat of Dymondia margaratae locally for my front yard planting strip. It’s been in short supply here in the Sacramento Valley because so many people have realized that it is perfect for so many things.

  2. Outstanding find! Maybe if I keep looking at the photos I’ll be able to gather the courage to pull out more roses.

    I think as more people get the hang of non-lawn front yards, we will see more at this level of beauty. There is that learning-curve thingy to overcome…

  3. Oh, I can’t imagine that space with a mere lawn – it is so beautiful with all the wonderful textures! The Pepper tree is to die for! Sometimes I use the pink peppercorns in my cooking. How cool it would be to be able to go outside and pick your own. Wonderful vignette, Denise – thanks for joining in! 🙂

  4. What a dream of a courtyard. I second Gerhard: more agaves would be nice. [feels guilty for loving pepper trees so much]

  5. @Gerhard, I am seeing so much use of dymondia here. Glad you got ahold of a flat. I’ve found it kinda slow to fill in.
    @Peter, I keep my eyes open!
    @Kris, my front garden is so not passerby-friendly like this one!
    @Hoov, you do have a courtyard-ish space where this could work, but then who would keep the few remaining rose nurseries in business?
    @Anna, thanks for hosting!
    @Alison, I so wanted to get in for a closer look but kept to the sidewalk rule.
    @Luisa, the non-plant collectors out there sometimes pull off the most amazing results, don’t they?

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