better know an agave

A rogue’s gallery of agaves from Jud’s garden. Some of these I know, some I’m guessing at, and some have really stumped me.
If you have an idea, I’m all ears.

 photo P1015861.jpg

Agave potatorum?

 photo P1016075.jpg

With Agave macroacantha in the background

 photo P1015993.jpg

Agave macroacantha

 photo P1015940.jpg

Agave macroacantha, possibly a selection of Agave titanota in the foreground (Agave horrida?)

 photo P1016027.jpg

This looks more like the Agave titanota I know.

 photo P1015919.jpg

Agave ferdinandi-regis

 photo P1015932.jpg

Agave guiengola ‘Creme Brulee’

 photo P1015934.jpg

And Agave guiengola ‘Creme Brulee’ with the anchor plant, Colletia paradoxa

 photo P1015957.jpg

Agave lophantha

 photo P1015976.jpg

 photo P1015882.jpg

with Agave guiengola ‘Creme Brulee’

 photo P1016025.jpg

Agave shawii?

 photo P1016051.jpg

with Agave havardiana in the background.

 photo P1015977.jpg

Definitely Agave havardiana (see comments for ID discussion)

 photo P1015961.jpg

Agave americana var. medio-picta ‘Alba’

 photo P1015963.jpg

 photo P1015860.jpg

Mark commented on the first post back in 2012 identifying this agave as A. isthmensis

 photo P1016022.jpg

Agave parrasana, the Cabbage Head Agave, also ID’d by Mark in the 2012 post

 photo P1016038.jpg

Agave victoriae-reginae

 photo P1016036.jpg

Agave celsii ‘Nova’? Or plain old Agave parryi minus the truncata?

 photo P1016055.jpg

Agave schidigera

 photo P1016071.jpg

Agave celsii ‘Multicolor’

 photo P1015887.jpg

Agave bovicornuta in the foreground

driveby agave garden revisited

I’ve been thinking of Jud’s garden. Did the recent unseasonal heat waves bruise any agaves?
I didn’t memorize the address, so it took a while to find again, which seems to be a recurring theme with this garden.
Was it on Colorado or Fourth Street? East or west of Termino?
After about a half hour’s meandering, suddenly there it was again, rising up out of the suburbs like a desert oasis mirage.

 photo P1015900.jpg

It certainly holds its corner like no other house I know.

 photo P1015893.jpg

The driveby view is splendid enough, but seeing it on foot is the only way to appreciate the multiple shifting perspectives of rosettes and spikes.

 photo P1016061.jpg

 photo P1015916.jpg photo P1015962.jpg

I’ve never seen Sticks on Fire as tall and narrow as cypresses. I wonder if they had to be pruned into these columnar shapes.

 photo P1015919.jpg

The agaves were indeed left unblemished by the 100-degree temps.

 photo P1015973.jpg

 photo P1015928.jpg

I’ll post a few more detailed photos of Jud’s garden this week.


driveby agave garden

I have the Long Beach Marathon to thank for finding this garden.
No, I didn’t run the marathon, more like actively avoided it. The marathon barricades cut off much of my end of Long Beach on October 6, so trying to get a few errands done was a circuitous challenge. I ended up in neighborhoods I don’t often see, such as the one where this front garden fills a corner lot. I vowed to return. Last night, 13 days later, I found it again, even though I had misremembered the street name.
Who needs street names with a garden like this? I bet locals use it for reference: “Hang a right at Little Lotusland…”


Photobucket

Continue reading

Sherman Gardens & Library

I took the day off yesterday to check out some local nurseries for dahlias and eucomis in flower.
(All my eucomis were bought as bulbs, some with leaves purportedly of varieties as dark or darker than ‘Oakhurst,’ but all instead carry leaves of the brightest green.) One of the nurseries was minutes away from the Sherman Library & Gardens, so I popped in for my first visit ever to this gem of a garden tucked into the busy shops and restaurants of Corona del Mar, just off Pacific Coast Highway within sight of the Pacific Ocean. A courtyard garden had been famously redesigned by Matthew V. Maggio in 2005-2006 during his internship there as a horticultural student. Prior to the renovation, the courtyard garden had been known as the Cactus Garden and included the requisite cactus kitsch, sun-bleached steer skulls and splintered wagon wheels, which Matthew felt more rightly belonged on a Hollywood movie set than a garden. Macabre ornaments such as these, depicting death and decay, mischaracterize and obscure the true story of ingenious survival written in every succulent. In an article Matthew wrote on the making of this garden for Pacific Horticulture (Volume 71, No. 4, Oct/Nov/Dec 2010), he shares his goals to “shatter conventional views about succulent plants, engender lasting excitement over succulents, inspire design creativity,” and in the new garden each of those goals is met and surpassed. All quotes are from this article.


Photobucket

Continue reading