Tag Archives: concrete

concrete containers by Dustin Gimbel

Dustin’s Facebook feed is showing lots of new work, and I just had to pop over to see what he’s been up to, even if it was almost too late in the afternoon for photos.

Invariably, whenever I post on Dustin, I get inquiries about his work, running the gamut from private individuals to public garden directors.
If there’s any questions, you can contact him at: dustingimbel@mac.com.

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If I understood correctly, the concrete is a special formulation with some kind of fibers that allows him to play with a range of shapes.

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Not made by Dustin but in keeping with the theme.

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Of course I had to check out his plants too, because there’s always something new.
For example, a client didn’t like this variegated Italian Buckthorn (Rhamnus alaternus), so Dustin brought it home.
Thank goodness he has lots of other creative outlets to balance out the occasional disagreeable client.

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The always envy-inducing variegated ponytail palm

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The hulk of the cherimoya tree, painted a cheery yellow, now supports a hanging garden of rhipsalis, tillandsias, bromeliads.
When the tree was alive, it rained down vast amounts of messy, fly-attractiing fruit. In its afterlife it’s become one of my favorite things in his garden.

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The fading light reflecting off the pond.

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I love how Dustin teams up extravagantly beautiful plants with containers made of simple geometric shapes.
The plain geometry of the containers is a wonderful counterpoint to the complex, exuberant geometry of plants.

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clippings 9/30/13

While on the subject of concrete, precast manhole covers, stacked. I prefer to have a day’s worth of concrete projects if I’m going to drag all that mess out.


http://www.bhg.com/home-improvement/patio/designs/backyard-patio-transformation/?socsrc=bhgpin050912#page=16 precast concrete manholes, stacked photo 101350652jpgrenditionlargest.jpg

Found at BHG here, but the link loads slow.


I was continually disturbing the dormancy of the little patch of nerines in the gravel garden by digging in what I forgetfully thought was available garden space, so I moved them into pots again. And not long after they’ve rewarded me for all that rough handling with a bloom. These South African bulbs are fast multipliers.

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Mine were gifts from Matt, who blogs at Growing With Plants. He keeps a wonderful greenhouse full of fall- and winter-blooming bulbs.

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And in the offchance your inbox hasn’t been inundated with friends sending you emails of the Fiona Apple/Chipotle/Willy Wonka Pure Imagination mashup, here’s the link to the video. And some words from The New Yorker on why this pretty little video on eating fresh is raising hackles.


On the subject of inboxes, Gmail users, what are we making of the new segregation system of sorting our mail that Gmail imposed this summer? Personally, I never click on the other categories, “social” or “promotions,” but read only mail labeled “primary.” Retailers suspect as much and aren’t happy about it: “Retailers Fight Exile From Gmail In-Boxes.” — The New York Times, September 15, 2013.
I’m still mad about losing Google Reader and have yet to find an effective replacement for keeping track of online reading.

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Knots. I see knots everywhere. Knotwork for enormous pots at Orange County’s The Lab

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And a photo from their website of the pots without their finery

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unsourced image from Pinterest

Did you ever wonder what holds the center of those heavy sailor doorstops? We have. Marty is a whiz at knotwork, but finding a large, heavy orb has been a problem. Bowling balls are too large. Currently we’re experimenting with bocce balls.


Ennis House

All Bladerunner fans, relax. Deckard’s house is safe.

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Frank Lloyd Wright’s Ennis house in Los Angeles was used as a set for some of the scenes in Bladerunner.
The Ennis House was released from a Wright family conservatorship in 2009 and has now been sold to a private party for $4.5 million.

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It’s these kind of brilliant design choices by director Ridley Scott that give Bladerunner its timeless quality.
One of four “textile block” homes by FLW, the Ennis house was built in 1924 and was FLW’s favorite.
The use of concrete was experimental, and it was hoped to be an affordable new building material.
The concrete blocks were cast on site, modeled in a Mayan Revival style with Greek key/meander motifs in the blocks.

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I’ve never been inside the house, and this photo gallery is the most extensive one I’ve seen so far.
I’m incredibly drawn to this house, but my husband is absolutely repulsed by it. Does anyone live snug and comfortable in a FLW home?
And why can’t we make fences with blocks like these? — albeit with modern-day building methods to minimize some of the crumbling the Ennis house has seen over the years.

A pity the blocks and house as built won’t last forever, but then what does?

More photos here.